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11/03/2013

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Georg:
It's been a while since I've commented here at RSE (I've been more or less offline for several months), but I wanted to say something about this post. I've long been a fan of Sowell, and have, because of his writings, only recently become aware of Deepak Lal. So imagine my surprise to find you writing about him! I am about 1/3 of the way through his "Reviving the Invisible Hand", and am thoroughly entranced; the two "papal revolutions" and the consequent divergence of "The West" and "the Rest" comes (to me)as a totally new way of thinking about our cultural, economic and political origins. Fascinating stuff - I am excited to finish this one and move on to his other work.

I hope this finds you well and I look forward to reading more from you.

Regards

Ed Stevens

Ed:

I am overjoyed to hear from you. Thanks ever so much for your appreciative words.

I have no right to complain about the poor resonance to my posts, but it sure is uplifting to read encouraging words from a cultured and discerning reader.

A slim volume by Deepak Lal, Unintended Consequences, gives a fuller account of the papal revolutions and the bifurcation between the West and the Rest.

As a student of liberty, my main interest presently is in understanding the real place of freedom in history and the contemporary world - as opposed to the stylised models so popular amongst many libertarians, who do the cause of liberty a great disservice by their retreat into a world of black and white.

By contrast, consider my

http://redstateeclectic.typepad.com/redstate_commentary/2013/02/the-blue-gravel-walk-of-freedom.html

I find the work of Michael Oakeshott exceedingly helpful in the task of placing liberty more accurately in the real world. However, avoid, at least for starters, his "On Human Conduct," his last and most popular, though ridiculously hard to read book.

Instead, help yourself to the treat of "Lectures in the History of Political Thought."

Best regards

Georg Thomas

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