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11/13/2012

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An ancient ritual wearing shorts, a belt, and sneakers from Walmart.

I run down food all the time. I'm always telling my wife that I'm going to "run down" to the store. :)

I've been reading a book (at a very slow pace before bed) about the not so wild west. It is an amazing look into societal developments over the western area of what is now the United States. Everything was contractual and it ran very well and was itself a form of governance. The sad part is how quickly the inept government (political mob) changed things.

For instance, ranchers had land-leasing rights with indians. The government then came in, cancelled ex post facto all agreements between the two parties and "offered" about 5 million dollars for the land. The ranchers had offered 30 million but the indians, knowing that the government would take the land by force if jilted, agreed to the 5 million dollar deal. Then came the homestead acts, races for land being given away by politicians, where people died in the mad attempts at staking a claim. All for expedients. Sadly, many who rushed in with high hopes didn't stay on their land. couldn't make it work.

This moment in history is where the term "Oklahoma Sooner" came from. Before the claim races, military men stood guard to ensure that no one started too "soon". If people saw someone advancing they would shout "Sooner! Shoot him!"

"An ancient ritual wearing shorts, a belt, and sneakers from Walmart." How odd. The bushmen like supermarekts, too.

Eric, you are reading a great book, indeed.

http://redstateeclectic.typepad.com/redstate_commentary/2010/07/the-mild-wild-west.html

Demonstrating that and in what manner the state is deficient is very important. As a classical liberal I am fundamentally suspicious of the state, and if anarchy is a viable solution to the tremendous danger always posed by the state, I am all for it.

However, there are a number of questions, insufficiently address by anarchists, that I would like to find answers to: why is there no civilization without a state? Why do state-type structures always (re)appear in more complex human communities, as they did in the Wild West, too? If there were an absolute trade-off / mutually exclusive choices (which there aren't, fortunately) between

(a) knowing why the state exists and what the conditions of its existence are, on the one hand, and

(b) moping and hoping for the state to disappear, on the other, I'd opt for (a).

"Why do state-type structures always (re)appear in more complex human communities, as they did in the Wild West, too?"

Here is the crux of the matter, imo. Anarchy is not a sustainable situation. Anarchism, a structured and accepted form of thinking and interaction (if it ever comes), would have rules AND enforcement of those rules (probably very sincere attempts at justice - if the above book is to be believed). Once enforcement is viable, it becomes in itself a form of government, doesn't it?

I may be setting myself up with a terribly thought out straw man, but it seems that government must exist whether we like to call it government or not. Personally, I'd prefer not to call it that because it then begins the ascendance process wherein the government is above the people rather than of the people. Once people believe this subjection is proper, we start to lose the innovative, property-based environment essential to the efficient allocation of resources.

As almost always I concur with your reasoning, Eric. Of course, the state in its modern form appeared at some point in time and will disappear, evolve out of existence, and maybe we will find a way to finally and fully solve the problem of (state) power abuse; but in order to get closer to that point we must learn more about the reasons for the persistence of the state phenomenon. Why is it that we do not seem to be able to escape it.

I am off in a minute, but hope to write more about this fascinating issue, maybe even today.

On a lighter note: Lucky s a total and complete statist. He thinks public choice is a lot of rubbish. He feels I am provinding him with entirely begnign, perfectly welcome, even irreplaceable government services.

"On a lighter note: Lucky s a total and complete statist. He thinks public choice is a lot of rubbish. He feels I am provinding him with entirely begnign, perfectly welcome, even irreplaceable government services."

Lol. There's that fine line between subservience and devotion. :)

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